The First Thanksgiving ...

Though it was not called Thanksgiving at the time, what we recognize as the first Thanksgiving feast was celebrated in 1621 by the pilgrims of the Plymouth colony along with about 90 Wampanoag Indians. The Pilgrims had suffered through a devastating winter in which nearly half their number died. Without the help of the Indians, all would have perished.
After the first harvest, Governor William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and prayer to God. The food, which was eaten outdoors, included corn, geese, turkeys, ducks, eel, clams, leeks, plums, cod, bass, barley, venison and corn bread. The feast lasted 3 days. Though the exact date is unknown, the feast clearly took place in late autumn.

In 1623, a period of drought was answered by colonists with a proclamation of prayer and fasting. This prayer and fasting was changed to another thanksgiving celebration when rains came during the prayers. Later that year, Governor Bradford proclaimed November 29 as a time for pilgrims to gather and "listen to ye pastor and render thanksgiving to ye Almighty God for all His blessings." 

God Bless you on this special day!
Simple Pleasures


Crafting Wednesdays

Here' a great idea for Thanksgiving that the kids and adults will love!

Tools and Materials
  • Sheet of standard printer paper
  • Scissors
  • Fringe scissors (optional)
  • Two small brown paper lunch bags
  • Popcorn
  • Hot-glue gun and hot-glue sticks
  • Large brown paper shopping bag
  • Plastic bags or wax paper for lining (optional)
  • Parsley (optional)
  • Fruit (optional)
Turkey How-To1. To make the frills, cut a sheet of standard printer paper in half, lengthwise. Fold each half in half, lengthwise. Make small cuts with scissors or fringe scissors on folded edges to create loops.

2. To make the drumsticks, put your fist in each of the corners of a small paper bag and use your other flat hand to mold and round the edges. Fill bag 2/3 of the way to the top with popcorn. Gather the opening of the bag and twist tightly. Hot-glue the beginning of the length of frill and wrap it around the twisted part of the lunch bag; hot-glue the end of the frill to hold in place. Repeat to make a second drumstick.

3. For the turkey body, round the corners of a large paper shopping bag. Fill the bag with popcorn. Fold the sides of the bag in, and tuck the bottom edge under, using hot glue to secure the edge closed.

Tip: If you can't find a large plain brown bag, carefully turn a printed bag inside out.

4. Use hot glue to attach drumsticks to sides of turkey body. Place on platter and garnish with parsley, fruit.

From Martha Stewart

Simple Pleasures


Christmas Craft Pomander Balls

Here's a great craft idea for the holidays! I'm making some this weekend so they will be ready for thanksgiving.
Making a Pomander Ball is easy, inexpensive and fun! Simply stick a clove directly into an orange (or any of the other fruits listed above). You may want to use a toothpick or pin to make the first punctures so that the cloves are easier to insert. It seems that everyone has his or her own method when it comes to filling a ball! You don't have to fill the entire ball though—try a pattern or design if you feel inspired.
Once the ball is completely studded with cloves, roll it in the spice mixture and set it aside for a couple of weeks in a cool dry spot so that it will dry. Once dried, tie a ribbon around the ball for hanging. Multiple pomander balls also look beautiful displayed together in a large decorative bowl. (If you want to retain the scent, roll the ball in orris root powder before letting dry).

Simple Pleasures


The Confession An Amish Musical

 While on vacation I went to see a musical called "The Confession". Beverly Lewis is my favorite author and I have read all of her Amish books so I was very excited to go to the Blue Gate theater and see the show. Here's the promo about the musical..
The Confession is a captivating story of a young Amish woman who is caught in the middle of secrets and scandal, love lost and love found, and personal heartache and healing.
With the laughter that ensues when a New York actress tries to play a “Plain” woman and the emotion that is inevitable when lies are uncovered and truth is revealed, audiences will enjoy a roller coaster of highs and lows. Mix that with soaring melodies, inspiring lyrics, and glorious orchestrations and the time will fly by.
“It’s a brilliant love story and a keep-you-at-the-edge-of-your-seat mystery all wrapped into one. Men and women alike will be anxious to find out what happens,” says premiere director, Wally Nason. And show producer Dan Posthuma adds, “Beverly Lewis is a remarkable storyteller. She has given us a rich plot, with compelling characters that courageously confront their past, their future, and their faith. And the music! You’ll have a hard time deciding which tune to hum on the way home.”
Beverly Lewis, who USA Today hails as the ‘queen of the genre’ when it comes to Amish love stories, is the one who wrote the book that the musical is based on (actually, the story comes from the trilogy of The Shunning, The Confession, and The Reckoning). 


Simple Pleasures


Das Dutchman Essenhaus Middlebury Indiana

One of my favorite places to visit is the small town of Middlebury Indiana. There is a wonderful place called Das Dutchman Esssenhaus that I visit when in town. Here are some pictures.


Simple Pleasures


Amish Country

Random pictures from my trip to Amish Country.

Simple Pleasures